8. Work inside the PHP container

The Devilbox allows you to completely work inside the PHP container (no matter what version), instead of your host operating system.

This brings a lot of advantages, such as that you don’t have to install any development tool on your OS or if you are on Windows, you get a full blown Linux environment.

Additionally, special port-bindings and forwards are in place that allows you to even interchangably work locally or inside the container without having to alter any php config for database and other connections.

See also

Available tools

Table of Contents

8.1. Enter the container

Entering the computer is fairly simple. The Devilbox ships with two scripts to do that. One for Linux and MacOS (shell.sh) and another one for Windows (shell.bat).

8.1.1. Entering from Linux or MacOS: shell.sh

# Navigate to the Devilbox directory
host> cd /path/to/devilbox

# Run provided script
host> ./shell.sh

# Now you are inside the PHP Linux container
devilbox@php-7.0.19 in /shared/httpd $

8.1.2. Entering from Windows: shell.bat

# Navigate to the Devilbox directory
C:/> cd C:/Users/user1/devilbox

# Run provided script
C:/Users/user1/devilbox> shell.bat

# Now you are inside the PHP Linux container
devilbox@php-7.0.19 in /shared/httpd $

8.2. Inside the container

8.2.1. devilbox user

By using the provided scripts to enter the container you will become the user devilbox. This user will have the same uid and gid as the user from your host operating system.

So no matter what files or directories you create inside the container, they will have the same permissions and uid/gid set your host operating system. This of course also works the other way round.

The uid and gid mappings are controlled via two .env variables called NEW_UID and NEW_GID

See also

If you want to find out more about synronized container permissions read up here: Syncronize container permissions

8.2.2. root user

Sometimes however it is also necessary to do some actions that require super user privileges. You can always become root inside the container by either impersonating it or by using sudo to issue commands.

By default sudo is configured to be used without passwords, so you can simply do the following:

# As user devilbox inside the container
devilbox@php-7.0.19 in /shared/httpd $ sudo su -

# You are now the root user
root@php-7.0.19 in /shared/httpd $

You can also use sudo to run commands with root privileges without having to become root first.

# As user devilbox inside the container
devilbox@php-7.0.19 in /shared/httpd $ sudo apt update
devilbox@php-7.0.19 in /shared/httpd $ sudo apt install nmap

8.3. Leave the container

When you are inside the container and want to return to your host operating, just type exit and you are out.

# As user devilbox inside the container
devilbox@php-7.0.19 in /shared/httpd $ exit

# You are now back on your host operating system
host>

8.4. Host to Container mappings

This section will give you an idea that there is actually no difference from inside the container and on your host operating system. Directory permissions, IP addresses, ports and DNS entries are fully syncronized allowing you to switch between container and host without having to change any settings.

8.4.1. File and directory Permissions

The username inside the container (devilbox) might be different from your local host operating system username, however its actual uid and gid will match. This is to ensure file and directory permissions are synronized inside and outside the container and no matter from which side you create files and directories, it will always look as if they are owned by your system user.

The uid and gid mappings are controlled via two .env variables called NEW_UID and NEW_GID

8.4.2. Directory mappings

One thing you should understand is the relation between the directories on your host operating system and the corresponding directory inside the PHP container.

The location of the data directory (HOST_PATH_HTTPD_DATADIR) on your host computer is controlled via the HOST_PATH_HTTPD_DATADIR variable inside the .env file. No matter what location you set it to, inside the container it will always be mapped to /shared/httpd.

See the following table for a few examples:

  Host operating system Inside PHP container
Data dir ./www/data /shared/httpd
Data dir /home/user1/www /shared/httpd
Data dir /var/www /shared/httpd

8.4.3. IP address mappings

The following table shows a mapping of IP addresses and hostnames. In other words, when you are inside the PHP container, you can reach the services via the below defined IP addresses or hostnames:

Container Name Hostname IP Address
DNS bind bind 172.16.238.100
PHP php php 172.16.238.10
Apache, Nginx httpd httpd 172.16.238.11
MySQL, MariaDB, PerconaDB mysql mysql 172.16.238.12
PostgreSQL pgsql pgsql 172.16.238.13
Redis redis redis 172.16.238.14
Memcached memcd memcd 172.16.238.15
MongoDB mongo mongo 172.16.238.16

Note

It is recommended to use hostnames as they can be remembered much easiert.

An example to access the MySQL database from within the PHP container:

# Access MySQL from your host operating system
host> mysql -h 127.0.0.1 -u root -p

# Access MySQL from within the PHP container
devilbox@php-7.0.19 in /shared/httpd $ mysql -h mysql -u root -p

So when setting up a configuration file from your PHP project you would for example use mysql as the host for your MySQL database connection:

<?php
// MySQL server connection
mysql_host = 'mysql';
mysql_port = '3306';
mysql_user = 'someusername';
mysql_pass = 'somepassword';
?>

8.4.4. Port mappings

By default, ports are also synronized between host operating system (the ports that are exposed) and the ports within the PHP container. This is however also configurable inside the .env file.

Service Port from host os Port from within PHP container
PHP NA 9000
Apache/Nginx 80 80
MySQL 3306 3306
PostgreSQL 5432 5432
Redis 6379 6379
Memcached 11211 11211
MongoDB 27017 27017

8.4.5. DNS mappings

All project DNS records are also available from inside the PHP container independent of the value of TLD_SUFFIX.

The PHP container is hooked up by default to the bundled DNS server and makes use Setup Auto DNS.

See also

You can achieve the same on your host operating system by explicitly enabling auto-dns. See also: Setup Auto DNS.

8.5. Checklist

  1. You know how to enter the PHP container
  2. You know how to become root inside the PHP container
  3. You know how to leave the container
  4. You know that file and directory permissions are synronized
  5. You know by what hostnames you can reach a specific service
  6. You know that project urls are available inside the container and on your host